High Level

Inglés y Español con el Método CALLAN - ¡Atrévete!

CONTENIDOS POR NIVEL

El Método CALLAN consta de 12 niveles


IVEL

CONTENIDO


Stage 1 is for students who are beginning to learn English. It introduces some of the most important words and structures in the language. In Stage 1, students learn the verbs "be" and "have", the present continuous (e.g. "you are writing"), subject and object pronouns ("I", "she", "me", "them" etc.), possessive adjectives ("my", "his", "our" etc.) and much indispensible basic vocabulary. This stage is appropriate for learners who are just starting their studies, or who are at the low end of A1 level according to the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference)


Stage 2 is for post-beginner learners. It covers areas such as the difference between the present simple (e.g. "you write") and present continuous (e.g. "you are writing"), the use of "any" and "some", and possessive pronouns ("mine", "hers", "ours" etc.). It also introduces comparative and superlative forms (e.g. "more than", "the least"), and a lot of essential vocabulary. This stage is appropriate for learners who are at A1 level according to the CEFR.


Stage 3 is the first of the two elementary stages of the Callan Method, and contains a great deal of useful vocabulary. It also offers further practice with comparative and superlative forms (e.g. "the furthest", "as many as"), focuses on the use of various common adverbs (e.g. "quickly", "often", "never"), and covers the verb "be" in the past (e.g. "they were") and the past simple of regular verbs (e.g. "we walked"). This stage is appropriate for learners who are at A1 and early A2 level according to the CEFR.


Stage 4 is the second elementary stage of the Callan Method. In addition to many items of everyday vocabulary, students are introduced to the past simple of irregular verbs (e.g. "he drank"), future forms ("will" and "going to"), the present perfect (e.g. "they have eaten"), and the 1st and 2nd conditionals (e.g. "If you go …, you will see …" and "If you went …, you would see …"). This stage is appropriate for learners who are at A2 and early B1 level according to the CEFR.


Stage 5 is for learners at the start of their intermediate level studies. In addition to containing much vocabulary appropriate for this level, Stage 5 covers a number of demanding areas of grammar. These include the past continuous (e.g. "I was sleeping"), the passive voice (e.g. "the book was written"), reflexive pronouns ("myself", "herself" etc.), the past perfect (e.g. "you had studied"), the future continuous (e.g. "she will be working") and the 3rd conditional (e.g. "If you had gone …, you would have seen …"). This stage is appropriate for learners at B1 level according to the CEFR, although it does contain some grammatical forms appropriate for B2 learners as well.


Stage 6 is for intermediate level students. It introduces a lot of new vocabulary appropriate for this level. In addition, Stage 6 covers many language areas appropriate for learners at B1 and B2 level according to the CEFR. These include indirect speech (e.g. "you told me that she would succeed"), causative structures (e.g. "he had his dinner cooked by his mother"), the future perfect (e.g. "you will have written"), and the past perfect continuous (e.g. "you had been writing"). By the end of Stage 6, a Callan Method student will have covered all language structures that are directly tested in a B1-level English examination.


Stage 7 extends learning for intermediate level students. In addition to practising many new words, Stage 7 contains useful phrases (e.g. "a great deal of") and also sees the introduction of common idioms (e.g. "get on someone's nerves"). There is a significant amount of new grammar, but there is also a focus on the consolidation and extension of structures first introduced in earlier stages. This stage is appropriate for learners at the higher end of B1 level according to the CEFR, and also those at B2 level.


Stage 8 is for those starting to move from the intermediate to the upper-intermediate phase of their learning. Vocabulary is extended, with hundreds more words, phrases and idioms. The questions in Stage 8 are often quite demanding, and give learners good practice in communicating more complex ideas. More new grammatical structures are introduced and practised, including the grammar associated with specific words such as "wish" (e.g. "I wish she were here"), and the use of modals to refer to past time (e.g. "they should have realized"). This stage is appropriate for learners at B2 level according to the CEFR.


Stage 9 is for learners at an upper-intermediate level. There are a large number of new words and expressions for students to practise, as well as focused consolidation work on both spelling and pronunciation. As learners are already able to express themselves fairly well, the questions in Stage 9 can be quite challenging. Grammatical work is mainly focused on forms and structures that enable communication to become more natural and efficient. This stage is appropriate for learners at B2 level according to the CEFR.


Stage 10 is for learners at an upper-intermediate level. As in Stage 9. there are a large number of new words and expressions for students to practise, as well as focused consolidation work on both spelling and pronunciation. As learners are already able to express themselves fairly well, the questions in Stage 10 can be quite challenging. Grammatical work is mainly focused on forms and structures that enable communication to become more natural and efficient. This stage is appropriate for learners at B2 level and those starting C1 level, according to the CEFR.


Stages 11 and 12 are the advanced levels of the Callan Method, and are appropriate for learners studying at level C1 of the CEFR. Many of the questions within these two stages are designed to elicit opinion, enabling students not only to practise the new language they are learning but also to express their own ideas more freely. Together, Stages 11 and 12 introduce over 1700 new words, expressions and phrasal verbs, and also cover advanced points of grammar that students are expected to know when sitting high-level EFL exams, such as inversions


In addition to the familiar Callan Method speaking practice, there are short exercises to revise useful collocations and introduce new expressions composed of words already covered in earlier stages of the Method. Stages 11 and 12 also contain special writing sections, in which students are given practical advice on dealing with a number of common text types, such as cover letters, reports and essays – optional homework titles are included for each of these. 

These two stages offer today’s higher-level students a great way to keep on improving, and, with the exercises and writing sections, they provide an ideal focus for anyone preparing for an exam either at upper-intermediate or advanced level.



Con el Método CALLAN todo es diferente

High Level
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